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How we can resolve compensation dispute:
@Coast_Capital credit union members could set Board pay by median vote

Modo the Car Co-op Director Elections:
Online voting needs online campaign forum

Letter to FICOM re Credit Unions:
Don't let foxes design hen house

Mountain Equipment Co-op AGM report:
@MEC pretends to be a #democracy

What Is Votermedia?:

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Votermedia at UBC:

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How Votermedia Affects Election Campaigns:

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Mainstream Media vs Voter Media:

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Votermedia Should Be Continuous:

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Expand Votermedia to Municipal Politics:

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  • Votermedia connects people who are about to vote, with people who have studied the issues. It helps communities connect with their elected leaders, by letting voters allocate community funds to competing blogs. This motivates bloggers to serve the community, especially during elections; also between elections. It can benefit democracies, co-ops and corporate shareowners. Likely early adopters include student unions, credit unions and municipal governments.
  • This website is a demo showing communities that could benefit from votermedia, and blogs that cover those communities now. This illustrates the potential future expansion of votermedia. If and when communities start funding their blogs, they will provide greater quality and quantity of useful content. Most of the ballots are not funded, but they are working so please vote for the blogs you think deserve it.
  • Votermedia in practice: Our best implementation so far has been at UBC, where the student union funded blogs using our system. As you can see from the videos, they consider it a success. It's explained in the paper Experiments in Voter Funded Media.
  • The Votermedia Democracy Blog covers related democratic reform projects, focusing mainly on co-ops and governments in and around Vancouver, Canada.

Which blogs serving your voter communities deserve funding?

Community Type Headquarters: Blogs
(click to see blogs) Country Prov/State City
Municipal Canada B.C. Vancouver 27
Country Canada Ontario Ottawa 19
Province Canada B.C. Victoria 19
Investor USA DC Washington 16
Country Iran Tehran Tehran 15
Other 13
Municipal Canada B.C. Nanaimo 9
Investor USA California Sacramento 9
Other Canada Ontario Ottawa 8
Municipal USA California Berkeley 8
Municipal Canada B.C. North Vancouver 7
Nonprofit Canada Ontario Ottawa 7
Student Canada B.C. Vancouver 7
Country USA DC Washington 7
Municipal Canada B.C. Burnaby 6
Municipal Canada Alberta Edmonton 6
Municipal Canada Quebec Montreal 6
Municipal Canada B.C. New Westminster 6
Other Canada Ontario Ottawa 6
Political Canada Ontario Ottawa 6
Corporation USA Washington Redmond 6
Labour USA DC Washington 6
State USA California Sacramento 6
Municipal Canada B.C. Surrey 5
Municipal Canada B.C. Victoria 5
Province Canada Alberta Edmonton 5
Municipal USA California Oakland 5
Student USA California Berkeley 5
Municipal Canada Ontario Toronto 4
Student Canada B.C. 4

  • It's easy to start for your community: Email your community and blog information to admin[at]votermedia.org. We'll create the ballot page, usually within a day. Voting can begin with or without funding. Bloggers compete for their rankings, plus for funds if/when your community ballot is funded. As soon as the ballot page is up, you promote it to potential voters, bloggers and funders.
  • It's cheap: Usually a community would persuade its government to fund the voter-selected blogs, so that funding comes from all who benefit. However, anyone can contribute funding. We suggest starting with $10/day/community, none of which goes to votermedia.org; it all goes to the bloggers. (We're an all-volunteer nonprofit project.) Start at any time, and continue throughout the year. We can put the funding schedule into our system to calculate awards. Funders can pay bloggers directly, based on automated output from your community's accounting page like this.
  • There's also this one-page Introduction to VoterMedia. Similar designs for public funding of media are advocated by leading thinkers Robert McChesney & John Nichols, and Dan Hind.